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Don’t Like Programming? Here are 5 IT Certifications that Don’t Require Programming

  • Programming
  • Career Path
  • Certifications
  • Published by: André Hammer on Jan 06, 2023
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It is not uncommon for IT professionals to dislike programming, as it can be challenging and require a high level of technical knowledge and skills. Programming involves using a specific language or set of languages to create or modify software and applications and can require significant time and effort to learn and master. People seem to be either born with or without a strong ability to think logically and understand abstractions. No one knows for sure what parts of the brain may be to blame for these differences. At the same time, it's important to remember that some people may not be inclined toward programming for other reasons. If someone doesn't believe in their own proficiency, it can make it hard for them to learn hard concepts or even concepts that are just thought to be hard. People can also be distracted by things like financial constraints that make it hard for them to put all of their mental energy into learning computer science.

Also, when it comes to programming, many people start young, which is primarily due to their environment, like whether they had easy access to a computer. By the time they get to college, they're already far ahead of everyone else, so it looks like programming comes "naturally" to them, when in reality they just had a head start.

While programming skills are often necessary for certain IT roles, it is possible to have a successful career in the field without enjoying or specializing in programming.

Thankfully, not all IT certifications include programming as a requirement or a focus area. Many IT certifications focus on specific technologies or methodologies, such as networking, security, or project management, and do not require programming skills. There are also certifications available for specific programming languages, such as Java or Python, but these are not necessarily required or included in all IT certifications. It is important to carefully research and compares different certifications available to determine which ones align with your interests and career goals.

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Pros and Cons of Programming in IT Certifications

Like everything in life, even programming as a career has its advantages and disadvantages. So here is a look at both sides of the coin, so you can make an educated decision about your IT certifications.

Pros

  • Demonstrated proficiency: A programming certification can demonstrate to potential employers that you have the skills and knowledge to effectively use a specific programming language or technology.
  • Relevant training: Many programming certifications require training and continuing education, which can help you stay up-to-date on the latest developments and best practices in the field.
  • Credibility: Having a programming certification can help establish you as a credible professional in the field, which can be valuable for job prospects and advancement opportunities.
  • Specialization: A programming certification can help you specialize in a specific area of programming, such as web development or data analysis, which can make you more valuable to potential employers.

Cons:

  • Limited scope - Many programming certifications focus on specific languages or technologies, which can limit their relevance and value in the broader IT field. For example, a certification in a specific programming language may not be applicable to other languages or technologies, and may not provide the same level of recognition or credibility as more general IT certifications.
  • Outdated information - The fast-paced nature of the tech industry means that programming languages and technologies are constantly evolving and changing. This can make it difficult for certification programs to keep up with the latest developments and ensure that the information they provide is current and relevant. As a result, some programming certifications may contain outdated information or no longer be applicable to the current job market.
  • Limited value - Many employers and hiring managers place more emphasis on real-world experience and practical skills than on certifications. This can make it difficult for individuals with programming certifications to stand out from other candidates and demonstrate their value to potential employers. In some cases, employers may view certifications as a basic requirement and not as a significant differentiator when evaluating candidates.
  • Cost and time commitment - Obtaining a programming certification can be expensive and time-consuming, as it typically requires taking courses, attending training sessions, and passing exams. This can be a significant investment of both time and money, and may not provide a good return on investment if the certification does not lead to improved job prospects or salary increases.

Overall, while programming certifications can be valuable for some individuals, they may not be suitable for everyone and may have some disadvantages. It is important to carefully research and compare the different certifications available and consider the potential costs and benefits before making a decision. Here are the top 5 IT certifications that do not involve programming.

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Top 5 IT Certifications That Do Not Require Programming

If you're an IT professional who doesn’t enjoy programming, it can be challenging to find certification programs that align with your interests and career goals. However, there are still many valuable certifications available that can help you advance in your field and enhance your skillset without requiring a background in programming. Here are five top certifications for IT professionals who don't like programming:

1) Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)

The Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) is a highly respected certification in the field of information security. It is designed for IT professionals who have at least five years of experience in the field and want to demonstrate their expertise in areas such as security engineering, risk management, and cryptography.

To earn the CISSP certification, you must pass a rigorous exam that covers a wide range of topics, including security architecture and design, security operations, and asset security. While some programming knowledge may be helpful in certain areas of the exam, it is not a requirement for success. The exam consists of 250 multiple-choice questions and must be completed within six hours. Candidates must also agree to abide by the (ISC)² Code of Ethics and have at least five years of experience in the field, with a minimum of three years in at least two of the eight domains of the (ISC)² CBK.

The CISSP certification has an initial cost of $699 for (ISC)² members and $999 for non-members. In addition, certified individuals must pay an annual maintenance fee of $125 for (ISC)² members and $225 for non-members.

2) Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)

The Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC) certification is ideal for IT professionals who want to specialize in risk management and information systems control. It is offered by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA) and is recognized globally as a benchmark of expertise in this field.

To earn the CRISC certification, you must have at least three years of experience in IT risk management and pass a comprehensive exam that covers topics such as risk identification, assessment, and evaluation. While programming skills are not required for this certification, a strong understanding of IT systems and their potential vulnerabilities is essential. The exam consists of 150 multiple-choice questions and must be completed within four hours. Candidates must also agree to abide by the ISACA Code of Professional Ethics and maintain their certification through continuing professional education (CPE) credits.

Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC) - The CRISC certification has an initial cost of $450 for ISACA members and $725 for non-members. In addition, certified individuals must pay an annual maintenance fee of $45 for ISACA members and $85 for non-members.

3) Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

The Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) certification is another popular option for IT professionals who want to specialize in information security. It is offered by ISACA and focuses specifically on the management of an organization's security program.

To earn the CISM certification, you must have at least five years of experience in the field and pass an exam that covers topics such as security governance, risk management, and incident management. While programming skills are not required for this certification, a strong understanding of IT systems and their potential vulnerabilities is essential. The exam consists of 150 multiple-choice questions and must be completed within four hours. Candidates must also agree to abide by the ISACA Code of Professional Ethics and maintain their certification through continuing professional education (CPE) credits.

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) - The CISM certification has an initial cost of $450 for ISACA members and $725 for non-members. In addition, certified individuals must pay an annual maintenance fee of $45 for ISACA members and $85 for non-members.

4) Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)

The Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification is designed for IT professionals who want to learn how to identify and exploit vulnerabilities in computer systems. This certification is offered by the International Council of Electronic Commerce Consultants (EC-Council) and is highly respected in the industry.

To earn the CEH certification, you must pass a comprehensive exam that covers topics such as network security, cryptography, and web application security. While some programming knowledge may be helpful in certain areas of the exam, it is not a requirement for success. The exam consists of 125 multiple-choice questions and must be completed within four hours. Candidates must be Certified Ethical Hackers (CEH) - The CEH certification has an initial cost of $1,199 for EC-Council members and $1,699 for non-members. There are no ongoing maintenance fees for this certification.

5) CompTIA A+

This certification is considered the industry standard for entry-level IT professionals and is often a prerequisite for many IT roles. The exam covers a wide range of topics including hardware, networking, and security, and is designed to test the knowledge and skills of IT support professionals. Upon passing the exam, individuals will earn the CompTIA A+ certification, which is valid for three years.

To earn the CompTIA A+ certification, individuals must pass two exams: the 220-1001 (Core 1) exam and the 220-1002 (Core 2) exam. These exams are designed to test the knowledge and skills of IT support professionals in a variety of areas, including hardware and networking technologies, security, and troubleshooting.

The CompTIA A+ certification is valid for three years, after which individuals must renew their certification by taking continuing education courses or passing a recertification exam. Renewing the certification is important, as it helps individuals stay up-to-date with the latest technologies and best practices in the field of IT support.

The cost of the CompTIA A+ certification exam is $219 for members and $319 for non-members. This price does not include the cost of study materials, training courses, or other resources that may be necessary to prepare for the exam.

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Closing Thoughts

There are many IT certifications that do not require programming skills, and the best one for you will depend on your personal goals and interests. Certifications can provide a recognized and standardized measure of expertise and can help professionals differentiate themselves in the job market.

If you are considering getting certified, Readynez has you covered. Through years of experience working with more than 1000 top companies in the world, we have architected the Readynez Best Practice Model for learning and customized training.

Train in any technology, anywhere in the world, using the award-winning Readynez method that offers comprehensive and high-quality training that is designed to help individuals prepare for certification exams.

If you are unsure about anything regarding certifications, be it about programming, costs, timelines, etc, our team of professionals is available to chat with you at any given time. All you have to do is get in touch!

Overall, obtaining an IT certification can be a valuable investment in your career, and Readynez can provide the training and support necessary to succeed. Consider pursuing an IT certification and take the first step towards advancing your career in the field of technology.

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